Module @tapjs/filter - v1.2.18

@tapjs/filter

A default tap plugin providing only and grep functionality.

Occasionally, you just want to run a small subset of the tests in a file, without the trouble of going into the file itself and commenting out all the other ones.

This plugin gives you a handy way to do that.

USAGE

This plugin is installed with tap by default. If you had previously removed it, you can tap plugin add @tapjs/filter to bring it back.

grep

Imagine if you had a test like this:

// test.mts
import t from 'tap'
import { MyThing } from '../src/my-thing.ts'

t.test('foo the bars', async t => {
const mt = new MyThing()
// this takes a while...
await mt.foo(mt.bars)
for (const b of mt.bars) {
t.equal(b.foo, true)
}
})

t.test('bar all the foos', async t => {
const mt = new MyThing()
// this takes a while...
await mt.bar(mt.foos)
for (const f of mt.foos) {
t.equal(f.bar, true)
}
})

Things are great, and my module seems to work, but then someone finds a case where the mt.bar function throws an error. While working on fixing this issue, I can run just the second test by doing this:

$ tap --grep 'bar all the foos' test.mts

The --grep argument can be specified multiple times on the command line (or as an array in a config file), to grep through a series of child tests.

// test.mts
import t from 'tap'
t.test('parent test', t => {
t.test('child one', () => {
t.test('subtest a', t => t.end())
t.test('the b test', t => t.end())
t.end()
})
t.test('child two', () => {
t.test('subtest a', t => t.end())
t.test('the b test', t => t.end())
t.end()
})
t.end()
})

If you run tap -g parent -g one -g a then it will run only subtest a under child one.

Grep Flags

You can specify grep flags by writing the argument as a JavaScript RegExp literal.

// test.mts
// run with `-g /foo/i` to run both foo and FOO tests, but not bar
import t from 'tap'
t.test('foo', t => t.end())
t.test('FOO', t => t.end())
t.test('bar', t => t.end())

Grep Invert

Specify the --grep-invert (or -i) flag to invert the matches. That is, then the things matching the pattern will not be run, and other tests will be.

only

Another way, if you don't mind editing the file a little bit, is to put { only: true } in the subtest options, like this:

t.test('bar all the foos', { only: true }, async t => {
const mt = new MyThing()
// this takes a while...
await mt.bar(mt.foos)
for (const f of mt.foos) {
t.equal(f.bar, true)
}
})

Or, you can use the t.only() function instead of t.test:

t.only('bar all the foos', async t => {
const mt = new MyThing()
// this takes a while...
await mt.bar(mt.foos)
for (const f of mt.foos) {
t.equal(f.bar, true)
}
})

Then, run tap --only test.mts, and it will only run tests marked with only.

In order to make this work, a runOnly flag is added in the test options and on the test object itself, which you can set explicitly as well. This is handy if you want the only filtering happening in just one test file, or just one subtest in a file:

import t from 'tap'
t.runOnly = true
t.only('this will run', t => t.end())
t.test('this will be skipped', t => t.end())

Or, in a subtest:

import t from 'tap'
t.test('parent test', { runOnly: true }, async t => {
t.only('this will run', t => t.end())
t.test('this will be skipped', t => t.end())
})
t.test('this will run', t => t.end())

You can also explicitly disable only behavior, even if it's set on the command line, by setting runOnly explicitly to false.

import t from 'tap'
// override the --only flag
t.runOnly = false
t.only('this will run', t => t.end())
t.test('so will this, even with --only', t => t.end())

--filter-quietly

By default, when a test is skipped with --grep or --only, a skip message is applied, indicating why it was omitted.

This is often desireable, but can be noisy. The --filter-quietly config flag will disable this reporting, making filtered tests look like empty passing assertions.

Since a skip message will cause failures when --fail-skip is set, in that case --filter-quietly will be enabled by default. Presumably, if you tell tap "fail on skipped tests", you don't also mean for it to fail on tests that you have told it to skip in that very same command with --grep or --only.

If you do mean to have it fail on intentionally skipped tests, then you can set --no-filter-quietly (or filter-quietly: false in a .taprc file) along with --fail-skip.

Index

Classes

Functions

Configuration

Test Options

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